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Photo by Karolina Grabowska via Pexels

Database Provider

Topics

Drawing, Language

Grades

9th, 10th, 11th, 12th

Subject

English Language Arts

Duration

60 minutes

Regional Focus

Global

Format

Google Docs, Google Slides

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This lesson plan is licensed under Creative Commons.

Creative Commons License

Artistic Slogans & Parallel Structure

Created By Teacher:
Last Updated:
May 16, 2024
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Synopsis

In this lesson, students evaluate three slogans on climate awareness and advocacy and create their own artistic slogans with four specific types of parallel structure.

 

Step 1 - Inquire: Students evaluate visual and writing components of three slogans on climate change awareness and advocacy.

 

Step 2 - Investigate: Students watch introductory videos on climate change, take notes on the main ideas, reflect on meaningful evidence, and discuss the effectiveness of climate protests.

 

Step 3 - Inspire: Students learn four types of parallel structure and create slogans combining parallel structures, climate change facts, and art.

Accompanying Teaching Materials
Teaching Tips

Positives

  • This lesson can be used in all levels of English and art classes.

  • Art teachers can use this lesson in any unit and incorporate other art components.

  • Students are given voice and choice in this lesson as they learn to manipulate language to achieve different outcomes.

  • This lesson can be used as an introduction to climate change and overall climate awareness.

  • This lesson can be added to a science lesson evaluating evidence for climate change or a communications or business lesson on marketing.

  • This lesson can be used to discuss climate justice in social studies.

Additional Prerequisites

  • Students should have some understanding of basic grammar and parallel structure.

  • Students should have an understanding of slogans and their purpose.

  • Students should have access to computers or art materials in order to create the final version of their parallel structure slogan.

Differentiation

  • Students’ use of language and vocabulary can be simple or complex in order to fit the needs of the class.

  • Teachers can simplify the lesson by focusing on only one or two forms of parallel structure.

  • Art teachers can have students design two different visual pieces to go with the same slogan, then compare and contrast the effects of the different artistic elements on the overall message.

  • Additional scaffolding for AP English classes can include a discussion on the purposes and effects of each specific form of parallel structure as well as an analysis of parallel structures in literature.

  • Teachers can connect the parallel structure skills in this lesson to their current reading material or curriculum. For example, students can identify forms of parallel structure in previously assigned class literature or nonfiction readings.

  • Teachers can extend this lesson into various writing activities for students to practice expository, analytical, descriptive, or narrative writing with different forms of parallel structure.

Scientist Notes

The lesson enables students to understand the intrinsic value of slogans in climate and social justice advocacy. Students would also practice how to use artistic slogans to communicate climate change impact to diverse audiences and policymakers in order to inform better decision-making and drive climate action. All materials have been carefully reviewed, and this lesson is recommended for teaching.

Standards

This resource addresses the listed standards. To fully meet standards, search for more related resources.

Supporting Standards

  • Visual & Performing Arts
    • Visual Arts: Standard 7 - Perceiving and analyzing products.
      • 1.5.12acc.Re7b: Evaluate the effectiveness of visual artworks to influence ideas, feelings, and behaviors of specific audiences.
  • English Language Arts
    • Reading: Informational Text (K-12)
      • RI.PP.9–10.5 Determine an author’s purpose in a text (including cultural experience and knowledge reflected in text originating outside the United States) and analyze how an author uses rhetorical devices to advance that purpose.
      • RI.PP.11–12.5 Analyze an author’s purpose in a text distinguishing what is directly stated in a text or through rhetoric, analyzing how style and content convey information and advance a point of view.
    • Writing (K-12)
      • W.WP.9–10.4 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, trying a new approach; sustaining effort to complete complex writing tasks; seeking out feedback and reflecting on personal writing progress; consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
      • W.WP.11–12.4 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, trying a new approach; sustaining effort to complete complex writing tasks; tracking and reflecting on personal writing progress (e.g., using portfolios, journals, conferencing); or consulting a style manual (such as MLA or APA Style), focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Note On Standards:

This lesson is aligned to SubjectToClimate standards. Review the aligned standards directly in the lesson plan document and teacher slideshow.

Discover more on SubjectToClimate.
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